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Published on 30 April 2009

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Tibotec releases further data for treatment of hepatitis C

teaser

Tibotec, a company that focuses on innovative treatments for infectious diseases, publish further information regarding the telaprevir data for treatment of hepatitis C:

DATA OVERVIEW

  • The results of PROVE 1 and PROVE 2 show that the addition of telaprevir to standard hepatitis C (HCV) therapies significantly improved cure rates in half the time of current treatments

– Telaprevir-based therapy was effective in up to 69% of patients with 24 weeks of treatment

– In the control arm, current standard therapies for HCV were shown to be effective in less than half of patients (46%) and therapy was needed for up to 48 weeks

TELAPREVIR BACKGROUND

  • Telaprevir is being developed through a collaboration between Tibotec and Vertex Pharmaceuticals.  There are currently two fully enrolled Phase 3 trials examining telaprevir in HCV patients:

– REALIZE – examining telaprevir use in treatment-experienced HCV patients

– ADVANCE – examining telaprevir use in treatment-naïve HCV patients

– A third phase 3 study, ILLUMINATE, will provide additional data on telaprevir in treatment-naïve patients

– Tibotec has the right to develop and commercialise telaprevir in Europe, South America, the Middle East, Africa, India, Australia and New Zealand.  Vertex will commercialise telaprevir in the US, Canada, Mexico and the Far East

HCV BACKGROUND

With an estimated 170 million people infected worldwide and three to four million people newly infected each year, HCV poses a significant burden on patients and society.  Chronic infection with HCV, a blood-borne infectious disease that affects the liver, can lead to liver cancer and other serious and fatal liver diseases.  It is the most common cause of liver transplant in Europe.

Tibotec



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